Then the explosion came. This man slipped down a narrow street as soon as he saw Kharkoff fall. As people were running to Kharkoff's assistance, I did the same. He saw me following him and ran, and I ran, too, and overtook him. Mr. Jameson, when I looked into his face I could not believe it. Revalenko he is one of the most ardent members of our organisation.

"Think bomb perhaps all right. K. case different from S. No public sentiment." "So Kharkoff had been marked for slaughter," I thought. Or was "K." Kazanovitch? I regarded Revalenko more closely. He was suspiciously sullen. "Must have more money. Cable ten thousand rubles at once Russian consul-general. Will advise you plot against Czar as details perfected here.

In intense silence Kennedy passed before each of us, holding up the blue-print and searchingly scanning the faces. No one betrayed by any sign that he recognised it. At last it came to Revalenko himself. "The checkerboard, the checkerboard!" he cried, his eyes half starting from their sockets as he gazed at it. "Yes," said Kennedy in a low tone, "the checkerboard.

"Would it be possible," he asked, "to let this Revalenko believe that he could trust you, that it would be safe for him to visit you to-night at Saratovsky's? Surely you can find some way of reassuring him." "Yes, I think that can be arranged," said Kazanovitch. "I will go to him, will make him think I have misunderstood him, that I have not lost faith in him, provided he can explain all.

Saratovsky of course was not guilty, for the plot had centred about him. Nor was little Samarova, nor Dr. Kharkoff. I noted Revalenko and Kazanovitch glaring at each other and hastily tried to decide which I more strongly suspected. "Will get K.," continued Kennedy. "Think bomb perhaps all right. K. case different from S. No public sentiment."

"Would it be possible," he asked, "to let this Revalenko believe that he could trust you, that it would be safe for him to visit you to-night at Saratovsky's? Surely you can find some way of reassuring him." "Yes, I think that can be arranged," said Kazanovitch. "I will go to him, will make him think I have misunderstood him, that I have not lost faith in him, provided he can explain all.

He will come. Trust me." "Very well, then. To-night at eight I shall be there," promised Kennedy, as the novelist and he shook hands. "What do you think of the Revalenko story?" I asked of Craig, as we started uptown again. "Anything is possible in this case," he answered sententiously. "Well," I exclaimed, "this all is truly Russian.

Then he put his hand up to my ear and whispered, "I have found out who it was who shadowed Kharkoff." "Who?" I asked, saying nothing of my long search of the morning. "His name is Revalenko Feodor Revalenko. I saw him standing across the street in front of the house last night after you had gone. When Kharkoff left, he followed him. I hurried out quietly and followed both of them.

"So Kharkoff had been marked for slaughter," I thought. Or was "K." Kazanovitch? I regarded Revalenko more closely. He was suspiciously sullen. "Must have more money. Cable ten thousand rubles at once Russian consul-general. Will advise you plot against Czar as details perfected here. Expect break up New York band with death of S."

In intense silence Kennedy passed before each of us, holding up the blue-print and searchingly scanning the faces. No one betrayed by any sign that he recognised it. At last it came to Revalenko himself. "The checkerboard, the checkerboard!" he cried, his eyes half starting from their sockets as he gazed at it. "Yes," said Kennedy in a low tone, "the checkerboard.