I knew them for the two cooks and the horse wranglers. One of the latter was grumbling. "Didn't git in till moon-up last night," he growled. "Might as well trade my bed for a lantern and be done with it."

No one noticed how he listened to the story, how he glanced more than once at the tired traveler, till they heard him order his horses at moon-up, order the landlord to wake the boy and feed him.

Anyhow, the boys'll be on guard ag'in it; they're out now. You two can eat and rest a bit, whilst gettin' good and ready; and if you set out 'fore moon-up you can easy get cl'ar, with what help we give you. We'll furnish mounts, grub, anything you need. I'll make shift without Frank." "Mounts!" I blurted, with a start that waked my arm to throbbing. "'Set out, you say? Why? And where?" "Anywhar.

Petway want Prissy bad enough to ask her, along about moon-up," said Mother Mayberry in a practical tone of voice. "Seems like I hear they voices; and if he IS over there I don't see how he can get out of co'ting some. It's just in the air to-night and WE'D better all be a-going to bed so as to get up early to start off.

He had turned at last and came back to where she sat. "No, I am not tired. Why do you ask?" "There'll be a moon soon. We can let the horses rest a bit.... I have ridden mine pretty hard the last few days ... and then after moon-up we can ride on. There's another shack where a man and his wife live just a little off the trail and about seven miles further on.