The quarters assigned me lay across the open space, or what might be called the parade ground of Fort Vancouver, flanked by Doctor McLaughlin's four little cannon.

This proved to be one of Major McLaughlin's Indian scouts. He bore a telegram reading: COLONEL WILLIAM F. CODY, Fort Yates, N.D.: The order for the detention of Sitting Bull has been rescinded. You are hereby ordered to return to Chicago and report to General Miles. BENJAMIN HARRISON, President. That ended my mission to Sitting Bull.

Nick then left the restaurant, taking Gaspard with him. Inspector Mclaughlin's men were by this time on hand, and they took charge of the house, under Nick's direction. At seven o'clock in the morning Nick received a message from Patsy, who had been directed to find the cabman in whose cab Corbut had fled. Patsy had located the cabman at his home on West Thirty-second street.

For a cross-section of the industrial revolution in New England, read C. F. Adams's Three Episodes of Massachusetts History . Davis R. Dewey's Financial History of the United States is standard; and A. C. McLaughlin's The Court, the Constitution and Parties , gives the best account of the beginnings of judicial supremacy, while W. G. Sumner's History of American Banking tells the story of the banks by sections.

It seems that several months before, at the suggestion of a group of scientists at White Sands, McLaughlin had carefully written up the details of the sightings and forwarded them to Washington. The report contained no personal opinions, just facts. The comments on McLaughlin's report had been wired back to White Sands from Washington and they were, "What are you drinking out there?"

A man who announced that his name was Sam Irving, and had been a great scoundrel and dog-fighter, said he used to go to Harry Jenning's; to Butler's, in Ninth Avenue; to McLaughlin's, in First Avenue; and to Kit Burns's, to see dogs fight and snarl at each other; he went to Ireland once to bring over a fighting-dog; the man who gave him that dog came to a terrible end by his own hand.

This force, which had now received the title of the Army of the Valley, was organised in three brigades: Third Brigade: Colonel Fulkerson. 23rd Virginia Regiment. 27th Virginia Regiment. McLaughlin's Battery 8 guns. Waters' Battery 4 guns. Carpenter's Battery 4 guns. Marye's Battery 4 guns. Shumaker's Battery 4 guns. Ashby's Regiment of Cavalry. Chew's Horse-Artillery Battery 3 guns.

What a moment of awful suspense it must have been when Breckenridge moved to attack with the veteran brigades of Echols and Whartons! How the mountain must have sent back the roaring echoes as McLaughlin's artillery went into action on a sharp ridge that ran parallel with the pike!

I don't know what these people saw. There has been a lot of interest generated by these sightings because of the extremely high qualifications and caliber of the observers. There is some legitimate doubt as to the accuracy of the speed and altitude figures that McLaughlin's crew arrived at from the data they measured with their theodolite. This doesn't mean much, however.

"Tell you what I'll do," said the brother-in-law; "just give me Mrs. McLaughlin's address, and I'll go to see her to-day while I'm in town. Then I can find out whether we have the right man in mind or not." Of course, nothing was said to Nellie about the clew to her father's whereabouts, but Mrs.