"By acknowledging and accepting the sovereignty of the United States throughout the entire Archipelago, as I now do without any reservation whatsoever, I believe that I am serving thee, my beloved country. May happiness be theirs. "Emilio Aguinaldo. "Manila, April 19, 1901."

"It is unfortunate," grumbled the Major, "but I must, I suppose, endure the delay. Unless," he continued, a sudden smile coming to his face as he thought of the cozy club-life he had formerly enjoyed at Manila, "unless I go with the messenger and receive my instructions verbally." "And in the meantime "

It does look pretty big and wild, dear, all that is ahead of us. But, after all, it's like any sea voyage, isn't it? Only we're going to be married when it's over. We Wouldn't think anything of taking a trip to Manila under ordinary circumstances, would we? It's all right, isn't it?" He squeezed her hand cautiously but fervently.

The historical part of Morga's account ends here; and the final chapter is devoted to a description of the islands and their people, the customs and religious beliefs of the natives, and the condition at that time of the Spanish colony and the city of Manila.

If war comes in that quarter of the globe we shall stand on ground that earthquakes cannot shake. The American Army in Manila.

The Commanding General will hereafter take occasion to mention to the Home Government, the names of officers, men and organizations, to whom special credit is due. By Command of Major-General Merritt: J. B. Babcock, Adjutant-General Official: Bentley Mott, Aid. Headquarters of the Provost-Marshal-General and Military Commandant. City of Manila, P. I., August 18th, 1898. General Orders, No. 1.

The bag contained the usual assortment of wearing apparel which Mr. Rover was in the habit of carrying when on a trip that was to last but a few days or a week. In addition, there were several letters and documents, placed in a thick manila envelope and marked with the owner's name. The boys read the letters and documents with interest. From them they learned that Mr.

'Take away that one chance, and they won't play. He turned to the man in charge of the Post. 'Storekeeper, weight out three fathoms of your best half-inch manila. 'We'll establish a precedent which will last the men of Forty-Mile to the end of time, he prophesied. Then he coiled the rope about his arm and led his followers out of doors, just in time to meet the principals.

But he has declared himself Dictator and President, and is trying to take Manila without our assistance. This is not probable, but if he can effect his purpose he will, I apprehend, antagonize any attempt on our part to establish a provisional government."

It is clear now that this is what the Spaniards ought to have tried to do. The Americans were committed to the blockade of Cuba, occupying all the vessels of war they had at hand, and the whole fleet of Spain could have been in the Suez Canal, on the way to Manila when the movement was known to our navy department.