'The bottle is now under examination by an expert, who has instructions to remove as little as possible of the stuff which Jules put on the rim of the mouth of it. It will be secretly replaced in its bin during the day. My idea is that by the mere action of pouring out the wine takes up some of the poison, which I deem to be very strong, and thus becomes fatal as it enters the glass.

"If I am not yet in, give it to the porter and tell him to send it up to madame." "Do you want me to-morrow?" "No. Adieu." Jules drove at once to the place de la Rotonde du Temple, where he left his cabriolet and went on foot to the rue des Enfants-Rouges. He found the house of Madame Etienne Gruget and examined it.

Setting aside for the present certain special modifications of this strange cycle which have been lately described by M. Jules Lichtenstein, let us consider for a moment what can be the origin and meaning of such an unusual and curious mode of reproduction.

September 20. Charles and his little family left the Hotel Navarin yesterday and installed themselves at 174, Rue de Rivoli. Charles and his wife, as well as Victor, will continue to dine with me every day. The attack upon Paris began yesterday. Louis Blanc, Gambetta and Jules Ferry came to see me this morning.

18th Went to Paris alone. 20th, long interview with the Duc Decazes. Dined at the Embassy. Thiers in the evening. The 'coup d'etat of the Marshal, as it was called, when Macmahon turned out Jules Simon and the Radicals, took place on May 16th, just before I reached Paris.

Sherry's was crowded, and a few tables away Banneker caught sight of Herbert Cressey, dining with a mixed party of a dozen. Presently Cressey came over. "What have you been doing with yourself?" he asked, shaking hands. "Haven't seen you for months." "Working," replied Banneker. "Sit down and have a cocktail. Two, Jules," he added to the attentive waiter.

Every day since his accident she had been allowed to make him two visits, one in the morning, and one in the afternoon. They helped wonderfully in shortening the long, tedious days for Jules.

This unfortunate man was Jules Lazet. He dropped to the ground. There was a second of silent stupor. Then four or five of the young men rushed forward to raise Lazet. The landlady ran about wringing her hands, and screaming with fright. Some of the assailants rushed into the street shouting, "Murder! Murder!" The others once more turned upon Gaston with cries of "Vengeance! kill him!"

Still, there used to appear in Varvara Pavlovna's drawing-room a certain M. Jules, a gentleman who bore a very bad character, whose appearance was unprepossessing, and whose manner was at once insolent and cringing like that of all duellists and people who have been horsewhipped.

The literary staff included four of the Brothers Mayhew Henry, Jules, Horace, and Augustus, two of whom, Jules and Horace, became godfathers to my father's first children by his second wife. Portch, Andrews, Duncan, Skelton, Bennett, McConnell, Linton, London, and Horace Harrall.