Julia and Horace, the chauffeur, however, had gone directly to the rock without the preliminary vagaries vouchsafed to their superiors, and by the time Mrs. Norris was finally captured they had succeeded in getting the supper well under way. Upon her arrival Mrs. Norris announced her intention of roasting a potato. "Gumgum, please sit down," begged her daughter.

"Now, Gumgum, you know that isn't sensible," broke in Mary severely a regrettable habit which seems increasingly prevalent among our modern daughters "unless you people were ninnies." "That was in Garfield's administration," replied Mrs. Norris absently, "or possibly a little before, in Hayes's Rutherford B. Hayes. He did away with the carpetbaggers and all those dreadful people in the South."

"You must come as soon as you can after dinner to have Tom explain what you are to do. Gumgum thinks we ought to have a rehearsal, but Tom has a five o'clock, and I don't think it's necessary anyway. He's really awfully funny and clever, Nancy, and you must like him." "I hate clever people. I have nothing to say to them.

"I ordered them this morning, Gumgum, myself, when I was ordering everything else. I had them on my list." "You did?" and Mrs. Norris burst into the most contagious laughter. "Tom, I wish you'd stop my daughter calling me that horrid name. It's disgusting. I'm going to call her 'Snuffles." "I really must go, Aunt Helen," said Whitman, starting for the door.

And she proceeded to invite the guests, Nancy and Tom, and Furbush, for it was true that he had been most attentive to Mary of late. Mrs. Norris at first refused to go, but Mary insisted. "You will have to watch the fire, Gumgum, while we are off looking for sticks and things." And so she had gone, after all. Mrs.