"Whereupon," said the bird-seller, "she gave me a look the like of which not many could give; for inasmuch as the lady is, for certain, over eyes and ears in love with Junker Kunz......" But I stopped him, and said that in this he was of a certainty mistaken; Howbeit he laughed shortly and went on. "Which of us saw her? I or you? But love or no love only listen till the end.

Look at me: I can cook, but I must not cook; I am skillful with the needle, but I must not take in sewing; I could keep accounts; I could nurse the sick; but I must not. I could be a confectioner, a milliner, a dressmaker, a vest-maker, a cleaner of gloves and laces, a dyer, a bird-seller, a mattress-maker, an upholsterer, a dancing-teacher, a florist "

"Whereupon," said the bird-seller, "she gave me a look the like of which not many could give; for inasmuch as the lady is, for certain, over eyes and ears in love with Junker Kunz...." But I stopped him, and said that in this he was of a certainty mistaken; Howbeit he laughed shortly and went on. "Which of us saw her? I or you? But love or no love only listen till the end.

The bird-seller was covering up his cages with loose wrappers, making ready to pack up for the night. "Hello!" he said cheerfully. "Thought I'd lost you for good." He took the child's money and handed the canary cage across the sill; also the bird-whistle, wrapped in a scrap of paper.

I succeeded after a while in getting him to tell me the name of the man to whom he sent his captives, and when I told him that I knew the man well a bird-seller in a low part of London he thawed visibly.

The bird-seller may do either and all of these things in the winter months; but, I only know his summer habitude: then he is always to be observed going about the streets with birds for sale.

No prerogative! No prerogative!" "You mustn't mind him," said the bird-seller genially. "He's like the crowd picks up a cry an' harps on it without understandin'." Master Dicky understood it no better; but thanked the man and ran off, prize in hand, to rejoin the girl. They hurried back to the Inn. At the gateway she paused. "I let you say what was wrong just now," she explained.

"Whereupon," said the bird-seller, "she gave me a look the like of which not many could give; for inasmuch as the lady is, for certain, over eyes and ears in love with Junker Kunz. . . ." But I stopped him, and said that in this he was of a certainty mistaken; Howbeit he laughed shortly and went on. "Which of us saw her? I or you? But love or no love only listen till the end.

It was during this Italian campaign that the young officer met with the woman who, four years later, became his wife, and the mother of his illustrious child. Mademoiselle Sophie Victorie Delaborde, was, emphatically speaking, a daughter of the people. Her father had been a poor bird-seller at Paris, where she herself had worked as a milliner.

"Bless my soul!" exclaimed the man, staring. "What, another?" "The bird-seller up the road had no change about him. And and, if you please," went on Dick hardily, with a glance at the girl, "she hurt her hands putting out a fire just now. I expect my father gave her the money for that. But she must have burnt her hands dreffully!"