I declined to receive endorsement for permission to fight for my country. Going home for a day or two soon after this conversation with General Pope, I wrote from Galena the following letter to the Adjutant-General of the Army. GALENA, ILLINOIS, May 24, 1861. COL. L. THOMAS Adjt. Gen. U. S. A., Washington, D. C.

"The line commenced moving about half-past three o'clock, in the following order, the military having the right of the line: "Gen. John O'Neill, President of the Fenian Brotherhood, and the following Staff Gen. J. Smolenski, Chief-of-Staff; Col. John W. Byron, Asst. Adjt.-General; Col. J.J. Donnelly, of Engineers; Major T. O'Leary, of Ordnance; Major Henry LeCaron, Com. Subsistence; Dr.

Then we gave up the Lewis above. It added more weight, and we did not need it so much. The trouble with the Lewis gun is that it has only ninety-seven cartridges, while the Vickers has five hundred, and you can do just as much damage with the Vickers as you could with them both. Senator Sutherland: You drive and fight at the same time? Adjt. Prince: Yes, sir. Adjt.

We are usually fighting inside of the German lines, because the morale of the French and English is better than that of the Germans to-day; and every fight I have had I have never been lucky enough to have one inside of my own lines they have all been inside of the German lines. Senator Kirby: What is the equipment of a battle plane such as you use? Adjt. Prince: I use the 180 horse-power machine.

I declined to receive endorsement for permission to fight for my country. Going home for a day or two soon after this conversation with General Pope, I wrote from Galena the following letter to the Adjutant-General of the Army. GALENA, ILLINOIS, May 24, 1861. COL. L. THOMAS Adjt. Gen. U. S. A., Washington, D. C.

Second Row. Farr.-Sgt. Lindsay, Sgts. Inglis, Gourlay, Farr.-Sgt. Renton, Sgt. Abbie, Saddler-Sgt. Smith, Sergt. Kirk, F.Q.M.S. Allan, Sgts. Hood, Walker, Colthart, Haig, Lumsden, Thorp, Dougall, Couper, Bradfield, Craig. Third Row. Sgts. Thornton, Aitken, S.Q.M.S. Craig, S.S.M. Edie, S.S.M. Ogilvie, Capt. and Adjt. M.E. Lindsay, R.S.M. R.G. Rapkin, Capt.

Rumsey: It is a sort of telescope that looks down between your legs, and you have to regulate yourself, observing your speed, and when you see the spot, you have to touch a button and off go these things. Adjt.

Admiral Peary: Have you any idea as to how many airplanes there are along that western front on the German side? Adjt. Prince: There must be about 3000 on that line in actual commission. Admiral Peary: That means, then, about 10,000 in all, at least? Adjt. Prince: I should think so; I should say the French have about 2000 and the English possibly 1000, or we have about 2500. Adjt.

The battle planes go up to protect photography machines, or to go man-hunting, as it is called; in other words, to fight the Germans. We fly all day, like to-day, as high as we can go, or as high as the French go as a rule, about 5500 metres, about 17,000 to 18,000 feet. Adjt. Rumsey: I think 5500 metres is about 19,000 feet. Some go up 6000 metres, which makes about 20,000 feet. Adjt.

The fighting machines on that trip only carried gasolene for two hours, and the other ones carried it for something like six hours, so we escorted them out for an hour, came back to our lines, filled up with gasolene, went out and met them and brought them back over the danger zone. Adjt. Prince: Near the trenches is where the danger zone is, because there the German fighting machines are located.