Next day snow fell in large flakes, and I went early to M. d'O 's, where I found Esther in the highest of spirits. She gave me a warm welcome, and began to rally me on having spent the whole night with Madame Trenti. I might possibly have shewn some slight confusion, but her father said an honest man had nothing to be ashamed of in admiring talent. Then, turning to me, he said,

"Tell me, M. Casanova, who this woman is?" "She is a Venetian whose husband died recently; I knew her when I was a lad, and it was six years since I had seen her last." "You were agreeably surprised, then, to see your daughter?" said Esther. "Why do you think the child is my daughter? Madame Trenti was married then." "The likeness is really too strong.

Next day snow fell in large flakes, and I went early to M. d'O 's, where I found Esther in the highest of spirits. She gave me a warm welcome, and began to rally me on having spent the whole night with Madame Trenti. I might possibly have shewn some slight confusion, but her father said an honest man had nothing to be ashamed of in admiring talent. Then, turning to me, he said,

In Holland she had been known as Madame Trenti, but at London she had taken the name of her lover Cornelius Rigerboos, whom she had contrived to ruin. She lived in Soho Square, almost facing the house of the Venetian ambassador. When I arrived I followed the instructions I had received in her last letter.

At this my lips were fastened on her mouth, her eyes, and on every spot of her lovely face. But seeing my eyes straying towards her bosom, and guessing that I should make myself master of it, she stopped laughing and put herself on the defensive. "Go away," said she, slyly, "go away and enjoy yourself at the Hague with the fair Trenti, who possesses so pretty a token of your love."

"You need not be afraid of my breaking it, and before I leave for the Hague I will prove that I am reliable." She then began to rally me on the pleasure I should have at the Hague, where I should see Madame Trenti again. Her freedom, mirth, and extreme beauty set my blood on fire, and M. d'O laughed heartily at the war his charming daughter waged on me.

She had exchanged the name of Trenti for that of Cornelis, or Cornely, which, as I found out afterwards, was Rigerboo's real name. We spent an hour in writing to this curious woman, as we desired to take advantage of the circumstance that a man whom Rigerboos desired to commend to her was shortly going to England.

"You need not be afraid of my breaking it, and before I leave for the Hague I will prove that I am reliable." She then began to rally me on the pleasure I should have at the Hague, where I should see Madame Trenti again. Her freedom, mirth, and extreme beauty set my blood on fire, and M. d'O laughed heartily at the war his charming daughter waged on me.

In Holland she had been known as Madame Trenti, but at London she had taken the name of her lover Cornelius Rigerboos, whom she had contrived to ruin. She lived in Soho Square, almost facing the house of the Venetian ambassador. When I arrived I followed the instructions I had received in her last letter.

"Tell me, M. Casanova, who this woman is?" "She is a Venetian whose husband died recently; I knew her when I was a lad, and it was six years since I had seen her last." "You were agreeably surprised, then, to see your daughter?" said Esther. "Why do you think the child is my daughter? Madame Trenti was married then." "The likeness is really too strong.