"Blame no man," saith Siracides, "before thou have inquired the matter: understand first, and then reform righteously. 'Rumor, res sine teste, sine judice, maligna, fallax'; Rumor is without witness, without judge, malicious and deceivable." This vanity of vulgar opinion it was, that gave St. Augustine argument to affirm, that he feared the praise of good men, and detested that of the evil.

You may bathe your soul in that Natura Maligna which only reveals its blessings to pagans and poets. Byron is the chosen bard of the destructive might of the mountains Ye toppling crags of ice!

The next morning, instead of repairing to the gaieties of the metropolis, Walter had, upon this slight and dubious clue, altered his journey northward, and with an unquiet yet sanguine spirit, the adventurous son commenced his search after the fate of a father evidently so unworthy of the anxiety he had excited. Quale per incertam Lunam sub luce maligna Est iter. Virgil.

The next morning, instead of repairing to the gaieties of the metropolis, Walter had, upon this slight and dubious clue, altered his journey northward, and with an unquiet yet sanguine spirit, the adventurous son commenced his search after the fate of a father evidently so unworthy of the anxiety he had excited. Quale per incertam Lunam sub luce maligna Est iter. Virgil.

With French imagination and grace, in his Introduction to General History, Michelet describes the tyranny of nature "Natura maligna" in India. "Man is utterly overpowered by nature there like a feeble child upon a mother's breast, alternately spoiled and beaten, and intoxicated rather than nourished by a milk too strong and stimulating for it."

The following letter appears to have been written in 1785, some months after the death of her sister, Miss Maria Linley. Her playful allusions to the fame of her own beauty might have been answered in the language of Paris to Helen: "Minor est tua gloria vero Famaque de forma pene maligna est." "Thy beauty far outruns even rumor's tongue, And envious fame leaves half thy charms unsung."

Femina causa fuit cur homo ruit a paradiso; Qua redit ad vitam, femina causa fuit. Femina prima parens exosa, maligna, superba; Femina virgo parens casta, benigna, pia. Quaest. ex vet. Test., 45; Migne, vol. 35, p. 2244. E.g., Tertullian, de virg. vel., 9. St. Paul of Nolan, letter 23, § 135 Migne, 61, p. 273. Id., letter 26, vol. 61, p. 732 of Migne. Cf.