John Carvel liked fine pictures, and he had placed three or four in the drawing-room, a couple of good Hogarths, a beautiful woman's head by Andrea del Sarto, and a military scene by Meissonnier, about as heterogeneous a quartette of really valuable works as could be got for money; and John had given a great deal of money for them.

She had encumbered the tables with useless articles of pottery; she had fastened a green plate between the better of the two Hogarths and an Arundel chromo-lithograph, and connected it with both the pictures by a drooping scarf of faint pink silk; she had adorned the engraving of Raphael's Transfiguration with a bit of Broussa embroidery, because it looked so very Oriental; and she had bedizened Mary Carvel's water-color view of Carisbrooke Castle with peacock's feathers, because they looked so very English.

The Brandons and Hogarths exchange Christmas visits with each other, and this year it is Jane's turn to be the entertainer, and Elsie with her husband and children have come down from the bush to have a little gaiety in Melbourne.

They admired the fine Hogarths; there were uncanny, unexpected objects that Laura edged away from, that she would have preferred not to be in the room with. They had been there half an hour it had grown much darker when they heard a tremendous peal of thunder and became aware that the storm had broken.

The Hogarths were living a little way out of London, in a residence which had a drawing-room opening with French windows on to a lawn.

He did not look behind: was like a man who has received a wound, and wonders whence. A pallor lay under his brown skin, brown almost as an Oriental's, and he was called "the Black Hogarth" the Hogarths being Saxon, on the mantel in the dining-room being a very simple coat a Bull on Gules. But Richard was a startling exception.

It may be that in a fashion she loved Dickens all her life, as she remained with him after he parted from her sister, taking the utmost care of his children, and looking out with unselfish fidelity for his many needs. It was Mary, however, the youngest of the Hogarths, who lived with the Dickenses during the first twelvemonth of their married life.

It may be that in a fashion she loved Dickens all her life, as she remained with him after he parted from her sister, taking the utmost care of his children, and looking out with unselfish fidelity for his many needs. It was Mary, however, the youngest of the Hogarths, who lived with the Dickenses during the first twelvemonth of their married life.

I was glad of a sight of the Botticellis, of which I had heard so much, and others of the more recently acquired paintings of the great masters; of a sweeping glance at the Turners; of a look at the well-remembered Hogarths and the memorable portraits by Sir Joshua.

I was glad of a sight of the Botticellis, of which I had heard so much, and others of the more recently acquired paintings of the great masters; of a sweeping glance at the Turners; of a look at the well-remembered Hogarths and the memorable portraits by Sir Joshua.