'Trust to me and I will find you warmth and shelter, said Doran-donn; 'and for food fish in plenty. And Covan went with him thankfully, and ate and rested, and laid aside three-thirds of his weariness. At sunrise he left his bed of dried sea-weed, which had floated up with the tide, and with a grateful heart bade farewell to Doran-donn.

'Because you trusted me and took what I had to offer, you have made me your friend, Covan, said Doran-donn. 'And if you should be in danger, and need help from one who can swim a river or dive beneath a wave, call to me and I will come to you. Then he plunged into the stream, and was seen no more.

And they began to eat the grass by the side of the stream, while Covan listened to them and longed for some supper also, for they had travelled far, and his limbs were weak under him. Then there was a swish of water at his feet, and out peeped the head of the famous otter Doran-donn of the stream.

And the Doran-donn dived, and laying hold of the salmon by his tail, bore it back to the place where Covan was standing. 'The roe, and the duck, and the salmon are here, said Covan to the old man, when he reached the cottage. And the old man smiled on him and bade him eat and drink, and after he hungered no more, he would speak with him.

But cast with what skill he might, it availed nothing, for the salmon would not even look at the bait. 'I am beaten at last, unless the Doran-donn can deliver me, he cried. And as he spoke there was a swish of the water, and the face of the Doran-donn looked up at him. 'O catch me, I pray you, that salmon under the rock! said Covan son of Gorla.