I called a taxi and drove round to the very delightful house the Bundercombes had taken in Prince's Gardens. I caught Mr. Bundercombe on the threshold. He would have hurried off, but I laid a detaining hand on his arm. "Come back with me, if you please," I begged. "I have some news. I need to consult you all." Mr. Bundercombe glanced at his watch. His manner was a little furtive.

I was not altogether surprised to receive, on the following morning before I had finished breakfast, a visit from Reggie. "Cheero!" he said brightly as he seated himself in my easy-chair and tapped the end of one of my cigarettes upon the tablecloth. "I haven't been up so early for months, but I had to find you before you went out about these Bundercombes." "What about them?"

I only know that I hope I may never have to do it again." Mr. Parker sighed. "I fear," he said, "that your troubles with us will soon be over. Eve has been telling me about that young idiot of an Englishman who visited the Bundercombes out in Okata. If there was one man whose name I thought I was safe to make use of it was Joe Bundercombe!"

Parker muttered "a piece of absolute bravado! But there's the young woman who's responsible!" he added, shaking his fist at Eve. "I may have suggested our coming to your party as the Bundercombes, but it was Eve's idea that we put up this little piece of bluff. Now I'm all for Paris!" he went on insinuatingly.

He was worrying me all yesterday morning to find out where you were, and when I evaded the point he told me straight that he didn't believe you were the Bundercombes at all. He is always in and out of this place, and if he sees your name on the register or his mother, Lady Enterdean, sees it it seems to me it's about all up!" "A piece of bravado, I must admit," Mr.