And I have creat respects for Palfour," he added. "I thank you for your honest expressions," said I. Whereupon Duncansby made his bow to the company, and left the chamber, as we had agreed upon before. "What have I to do with this?" says Prestongrange. "I will tell your lordship in two words," said I. "I have brought this gentleman, a King's officer, to do me so much justice.

As for Fraser, he looked before him on the table. "He is here to bear a little testimony in my favour, my lord, which I think it very needful you should hear," said I, and turned to Duncansby. "I have only to say this," said the lieutenant, "that I stood up this day with Palfour in the Hunter's Pog, which I am now fery sorry for, and he behaved himself as pretty as a shentlemans could ask it.

And I have creat respects for Palfour," he added. "I thank you for your honest expressions," said I. Whereupon Duncansby made his bow to the company, and left the chamber, as we had agreed upon before. "What have I to do with this?" says Prestongrange. "I will tell your lordship in two words," said I. "I have brought this gentleman, a King's officer, to do me so much justice.

I told him it was, not very kindly, for his manner was scant civil. "Ha, Palfour," says he, and then, repeating it, "Palfour, Palfour!" "I am afraid you do not like my name, sir," says I, annoyed with myself to be annoyed with such a rustical fellow. "No," says he, "but I wass thinking."

There will be a second and then a third; and by what you have seen of my cleverness with the cold steel, you can judge for yourself what is like to be the upshot." "And I would not like it myself, if I was no more of a man than what you wass!" he cried. "But I will do you right, Palfour. Lead on!" If I had walked slowly on the way into that accursed park my heels were light enough on the way out.

I told him it was, not very kindly, for his manner was scant civil. "Ha, Palfour," says he, and then, repeating it, "Palfour, Palfour!" "I am afraid you do not like my name, sir," says I, annoyed with myself to be annoyed with such a rustical fellow. "No," says he, "but I wass thinking."

There will be a second and then a third; and by what you have seen of my cleverness with the cold steel, you can judge for yourself what is like to be the upshot." "And I would not like it myself, if I wass no more of a man than what you wass!" he cried. "But I will do you right, Palfour. Lead on!"

And I declare if I had kent what way it wass, I would not put a hand to such a piece of pusiness." "That is handsomely said," I replied, "and I am sure you will not stand up a second time to be the actor for my private enemies." "Indeed, no, Palfour," said he; "and I think I was used extremely suffeeciently myself to be set up to fecht with an auld wife, or all the same as a bairn whateffer!

I told him it was, not very kindly, for his manner was scant civil. "Ha, Palfour," says he, and then, repeating it, "Palfour, Palfour!" "I am afraid you do not like my name, sir," says I, annoyed with myself to be annoyed with such a rustical fellow. "No," says he, "but I wass thinking."

I daresay, upon their side, they grudged me extremely the fine company in which I had arrived; and altogether I had soon fallen behind, and stepped stiffly in the rear of all that merriment with my own thoughts. From these I was recalled by one of the officers, Lieutenant Hector Duncansby, a gawky, leering Highland boy, asking if my name was not "Palfour."