Vietnam or Thailand ? Vote for the TOP Country of the Week !


Riccabocca was standing on the hearth under his symbolical representation of the "Patriae Exul." "Giacomo," quoth he, "I have been thinking that thou hast never done what I told thee, and fitted thyself out from my superfluities. But we are going now into the great world: visiting once begun, Heaven knows where it may stop. Go to the nearest town and get thyself clothes.

Milton, without being a very wide reader, was likely to have seen the Adamus Exul of Grotius , and he certainly had read Giles Fletcher's Christ's Victory and Triumph . There are traces of verbal reminiscence of Sylvester's translation of Du Bartas.

It was the figure of a man in a pilgrim's garb, chained to the earth by small but innumerable ligaments, while a phantom likeness of himself, his shadow, was seen hastening down what seemed an interminable vista; and underneath were written the pathetic words of Horace "Patriae quis exul Se quoque fugit?"

With Tertullian, St Jerome, and St Augustine he was of course acquainted, but of Lactantius, Prudentius, Sedulius, St Fortunatus, Duns Scotus, Hibernicus exul, Angilbert, Milo, &c., he was obliged to admit he knew nothing even the names were unknown to him.

Because of this failure it has by common consent been deposed from its once proud position at the head of the sciences and obliged to confess, in the words of the Trojan queen: modo maxima rerum Nunc trahor exul inops. The charge of unprogressiveness is not made against it by its foes alone; the truth of it is admitted by some of its best friends.

Such was my preceptor in the French and Italian tongues. 'Exul sacerdos; vone banished priest. I came into England twenty-five year ago, "my dear." Monsieur Dante Condemned musket Sporting Sweet rivulet The Earl's Home The pool The sonorous voice What dost thou read? Man of peace Zohar and Mishna Money-changers.

Samuel Kercheval, and also in an interesting Philadelphia publication, "Friends in Exile." To this day the old sun-dial in the garden of "Bousch's Tavern" has upon it the inscription: "Exul patria causâ libertates" with the names of the unfortunate exiles written under it always provided that the dial itself remains, and the rain, and snow, and sun, have not blotted out the words.

Now, after they had been awhile in the strange city, it happened that the poor Jew spent all his little money, and he too fell ill, and was in great penury. And now it was Laertes who befriended that Ebrew Jew. He fee'd doctors; he fed and tended the sick and hungry. Go to, Laertes! I know thee not. It may be thou art justly exul patriae.

Horace, who copied most of his Criticisms after Aristotle, seems to have had his Eye on the foregoing Rule in the following Verses: Et Tragicus plerumque dolet Sermone pedestri, Telephus et Peleus, cum pauper et exul uterque, Projicit ampullas et sesquipedalia verba, Si curat cor Spectantis tetigisse querela. Tragedians too lay by their State, to grieve.

It was the figure of a man in a pilgrim's garb, chained to the earth by small but innumerable ligaments, while a phantom likeness of himself, his shadow, was seen hastening down what seemed an interminable vista; and underneath were written the pathetic words of Horace "Patriae quis exul Se quoque fugit?"