All according to the will of God, and none dare say nay nor change the purpose of the Eternal." For some time the oil in the lamps had been failing since the Rabbi had been speaking for nigh two hours and as he came to an end of this passage the light began to flicker and die. First a lamp at the end of Burnbrae's pew went out and then another in the front.

"Yon were verra suitable words at the second table; he's a speeritually minded man, Maister Cosh, and has the richt sough." Or at the worst, when Burnbrae's courage had failed: "Maister McKittrick had a fine text afore the table. I aye like tae see a man gang tae the Song o' Solomon on the Sacrament Sabbath. A' mind Dr. Guthrie on that verra subject twenty years syne."

All according to the will of God, and none dare say nay nor change the purpose of the Eternal." For some time the oil in the lamps had been failing since the Rabbi had been speaking for nigh two hours and as he came to an end of this passage the light began to flicker and die. First a lamp at the end of Burnbrae's pew went out, and then another in the front.

The manners of Drumtochty were perfect, and no one turned his head by one inch; but Marget Howe, sitting behind in Burnbrae's pew, saw Flora's hand go out to Lachlan's as the people sang: "All thine iniquities who doth Most graciously forgive, Who thy diseases all and pains Doth heal and thee relieve."

"That is Burnbrae's dogcart . . . Dr. Saunderson, and I think he will not wish to keep his horse standing in the snow, so unless you will stay all night, as it's going to drift. . . . Then perhaps it would be better. . . . Can I assist you in packing?"

"That is Burnbrae's dog-cart . . . Doctor Saunderson, and I think he will not wish to keep his horse standing in the snow, so unless you will stay all night, as it's going to drift. . . . Then perhaps it would be better. . . . Can I assist you in packing?"