The joint efforts and intrigues of Parma, Champagny, Chimay, and Imbize, were near being successful. Early, in the spring of 1584 a formal resolution was passed by the government of Ghent, to open negotiations with Parma.

I tell you this were you ever so much hounded on by the Prince of Orange." The violence of the new governor excited the wrath of Imbize. He broke from him abruptly, and rushed to a rendezvous of his confederates, every man of whom was ready for a desperate venture. Groups of excited people were seen vociferating in different places. A drum was heard to rattle from time to time.

Imbize, fearing the influence of the Prince, indulged in open-mouthed abuse of a man whose character he was unable even to comprehend, He accused him of intriguing with France for his own benefit, of being a Papist in disguise, of desiring to establish what he called a "religious peace," merely to restore Roman idolatry.

Ryhove, not feeling very safe in the position of affairs which then existed, and knowing that he could neither trust Imbize, who had formerly been his friend, nor the imprisoned nobles, who had ever been his implacable enemies, was resolved to make himself safe in one quarter at least, before he set forth against the Malcontents.

The joint efforts and intrigues of Parma, Champagny, Chimay, and Imbize, were near being successful. Early, in the spring of 1584 a formal resolution was passed by the government of Ghent, to open negotiations with Parma.

Such witless but vehement denunciation from a preacher who was both popular and comparatively sincere, could, not but affect the imagination of the weaker portion of his, healers. The faction of Imbize became triumphant. Ryhove the ruffian whose hands were stained with the recent blood of Visch and Hessels rather did damage than service to the cause of order.

Both were led by men of abandoned and dangerous character. Imbize, the worse of the two demagogues, was inconstant, cruel, cowardly, and treacherous, but possessed of eloquence and a talent for intrigue. Ryhove was a bolder ruffian wrathful, bitter, and unscrupulous. Imbize was at the time opposed to Orange, disliking his moderation, and trembling at his firmness.

Birth, education, marriage, and youthful character of Alexander Farnese His private adventures Exploits at Lepanto and at Gemblours He succeeds to the government Personal appearance and characteristics Aspect of affairs Internal dissensions Anjou at Mons John Casimir's intrigues at Ghent Anjou disbands his soldiers The Netherlands ravaged by various foreign troops Anarchy and confusion in Ghent Imbize and Ryhove Fate of Hessels and Visch New Pacification drawn up by Orange Representations of Queen Elizabeth Remonstrance of Brussels Riots and image-breaking in Ghent Displeasure of Orange His presence implored at Ghent, where he establishes a Religious Peace Painful situation of John Casimir Sharp rebukes of Elizabeth He takes his departure His troops apply to Farnese, who allows them to leave the country Anjou's departure and manifesto Elizabeth's letters to the states-general with regard to him Complimentary addresses by the Estates to the Duke Death of Bossu Calumnies against Orange Venality of the malcontent grandees La Motte's treason Intrigues of the Prior of Renty Saint Aldegonde at Arras The Prior of St.

The murderous and mischievous pranks of Imbize, Ryhove, and such demagogues, at Ghent and elsewhere, with their wild theories of what they called Grecian, Roman, and Helvetian republicanism, had inflicted damage enough on the cause of freedom, and had paved the road for the return of royal despotism.

Both were led by men of abandoned and dangerous character. Imbize, the worse of the two demagogues, was inconstant, cruel, cowardly, and treacherous, but possessed of eloquence and a talent for intrigue. Ryhove was a bolder ruffian wrathful, bitter, and unscrupulous. Imbize was at the time opposed to Orange, disliking his moderation, and trembling at his firmness.