"We may not see her like again, but we may see her again," said Lothair; "and sometimes I think she is always hovering over me." In this vein, when they were alone, they were frequently speaking of the departed, and one day it was before the arrival of Prince Agathonides Mr. Phoebus said to Lothair: "We will ride this morning to what we call the grove of Daphne. It is a real laurel-grove.

It was the statue of Theodora, the placing of which in the pavilion of Belmont Mr. Phoebus was superintending when Lothair first made his acquaintance. The Prince Agathonides seemed quite to monopolize the attention of Madame Phoebus and her sister.

Phoebus informed them that the Prince Agathonides, the eldest son of the Prince of Samos, would arrive from Constantinople in a few days, and would pay them a visit. "He will come with some retinue," said Mr. Phoebus, "but I trust we shall be able by our reception to show that the Cantacuzenes are not the only princely family in the world." Mr.

The Prince Agathonides was a youth, good looking and dressed in a splendid Palikar costume, though his manners were quite European, being an attach to the Turkish embassy at Vienna. He had with him a sort of governor, a secretary, servants in Mamlouk dresses, pipe-bearers, and grooms, there being some horses as presents from his father to Mr.

Phoebus resolved to give a dinner in the Frank style, to prove to Agathonides that there were other members of the Cantacuzene family besides himself who comprehended a first-rate Frank dinner. The chief people of the island were invited to this banquet. They drank the choicest grapes of France and Germany, were stuffed with truffles, and sat on little cane chairs.