"By the wheelboat, or steamboat, as they ca'd it, to Lunnon: where they charged me sax-pence for taking my baggage on shore a wee boxy nae bigger than yon cocked-up hat. I would fain carry it mysel', but they wadna let me." "Well, where did you go to when you arrived in London?"

There was first the guard, and then the coachman, and another guard, and another coachman; but I wudna listen to them, and so they growled and abused me." "And when did you arrive?" "I came here last night; and I only had a bed and a breakfast at the twa Blue Pillars' house, for which they extortioned me three shillings and sax-pence, as I sit here.

"Indeed it is, sir," replied M'Foy; "and sorely I've been pestered. Had I minded all they whispered in my lug as I came along, I had need been made of money sax-pence here, sax-pence there, sax-pence every where. Sich extortion I ne'er dreamt of." "How did you come from Glasgow?"

"By the wheel-boat, or steam-boat, as they ca'd it, to Lunnon: where they charged me sax-pence for taking my baggage on shore a wee boxy nae bigger than yon cocked-up hat. I would fain carry it mysel', but they wudna let me." "How much of your ten-shillings have you left?" inquired the first lieutenant, smiling. "Hoot; sir lieutenant, how came you for to ken that?

The cloth would be five shillins, an' the beads a shillin'. I have some braid 'at would do fine for the front, but the buttons would be sax-pence." "Ye're sure o' that?" "I ken fine, for I got Leeby to price the things in the shop." "Ay, but it maun be ill to shape the cloaks richt. There was a queer cut aboot that ane Peter Dickie's new wife had on."

"Indeed it is, sir," replied McFoy; "and sorely I've been pestered. Had I minded all they whispered in my lug as I came along, I had need been made of money sax-pence here, sax-pence there, sax-pence everywhere. Sich extortion I ne'er dreamt of." "How did you come from Glasgow?"

"I went to a place ca'd Chichester Rents, to the house of Storm and Mainwaring, Warehousemen, and they must have another sax-pence for showing me the way. There I waited half-an-hour in the counting-house, till they took me to a place ca'd Bull and Mouth, and put me into a coach, paying my whole fare: nevertheless they must din me for money the whole of the way down.