I asked, for Lorna would not ask lest the reply should vex me. "Because 'ee be'est below her so. Her shanna' have a poor farmering chap, not even if her were a Carnishman. All her land, and all her birth and who be you, I'd like to know?" "Gwenny, you may go," said Lorna, reddening with quiet anger; "and remember that you come not near me for the next three days.

He left me fuming, for his last mutteration, as he shook his lantern to stir the flame up a bit, was, "Knows a true man when he sees one. More used to a carving-knife than a sword, I'll be bound. What did he say? Wheatman o' sommat! Reg'lar farmering name!" I kicked the door wide open and watched the lantern bobbing along the hall.

'What made you treat me so, little Gwenny? I asked, for Lorna would not ask lest the reply should vex me. 'Because 'ee be'est below her so. Her shanna' have a poor farmering chap, not even if her were a Carnishman. All her land, and all her birth and who be you, I'd like to know?

The ancient took another look at me and said to himself in a loud whisper, after the manner of old and favoured serving-men, "A farmering body all but his hat, and none o' your ride-by-nights." "Fetch him out!" said I again, not for want of fresh words to say to the candid old dodderer but to keep him to the point. "Oh-aye," said he, and shuffled off.

A crow could hide in it anywhere." "What have crows hiding got to do with corn, I'd like to know?" "When I was a boy the farmers used to say, 'If it will cover a crow's back on the Fourth of July, it will make good corn, and I am farmering with old saws when I can't find new ones." "It's all of three weeks yet to the Fourth of July, and your corn will cover a turkey by that time."