"Hez, sire asne, car chantez, BELLE BOUCHE rechignez; Vous aurez du foin assez, Et de l'avoine a plantez." "Well," said his friend, "now that you have mangled that French with your wretched pronunciation, please explain how my lovely Belinda come, don't sigh and scowl because I say 'my, for you know it's all settled tell me where in these lines you find her name."

By ASNE WHITNEY. New York: Appleton & Co. 1859. This modest volume is a collection of Miss Whitney's previously printed poems, scattered about in forgotten newspapers, with perhaps as many more, which now appear in print for the first time.

He sings, as he goes onward on his hard-trotting courser, the words of that song which we have heard him sing before: "Hez! sire asne! car chantez Belle bouche rechignez;" and is not mortified when a donkey in the neighboring meadow brays responsively.

And he handed his visitor, by this time stretched carelessly upon a lounge, the open volume. He read: "Orientis partibus Adventavit asinus, Pulcher et fortissimus, Sarcinis aptissimus. "Hez, sire asne, car chantez Belle bouche rechignez, Vous aurez du foin assez, Et de l'avoine a plantez."

But Sir Asinus, disregarding these strictures, began to sing the chorus: "Hez, Sire Asne, car chantez, Belle bouche rechignez; Vous aurez du foin assez, Et de l'avoine a plantez." "Good," said Jacques; "that signifies: Strike up, Sir Asinus, With your braying mouth; Never fear for hay, The crop of oats is ample.

Rabelais' printer got the satirical doctor into deep water for printing asne for ame; the council of the Sorbonne took the matter up and asked Francis I. to prosecute Rabelais for heresy; this the king declined to do, and Rabelais proceeded forthwith to torment the council for having founded a charge of heresy upon a printer's blunder.