But that best of Rishis Agastya addressing those royal sages, said, 'Yield ye not to grief, I will eat up the great Asura. And the mighty Rishi then sat himself down on an excellent seat, and the prince of Asuras, Ilwala, began to distribute the food smilingly. And after the dinner was over, Ilwala began to summon his brother.

For whomsoever Ilwala summoned with his voice, he would come back to Ilwala even if he had gone to the abode of Yama, in re-embodied form endued with life, and show himself to Ilwala. And so having transformed the Asura Vatapi into a ram and properly cooked his flesh and feeding Brahmanas therewith, he would summon Vatapi.

Give us what thou canst, without injuring others." Thus addressed Ilwala saluted the Rishi and said, "If thou say what it is that I mean to give, then will I give you wealth." Hearing this Agastya said, "O great Asura, thou hast even purposed to give unto each of these kings ten thousand kine and as many gold coins.

And the king also enquired after the extent of that man-destroying Daitya's prowess, and the reason also of the illustrious Agastya's wrath being excited against that Asura. "Thus questioned, Lomasa said, 'O son of Kuru race, there was in the city called Manimati, in days of yore, a Daitya named Ilwala, whose younger brother was Vatapi.

And, O monarch, all of them went together to Ilwala after this!" "Lomasa said, 'When Ilwala learnt that those kings along with the great Rishi had arrived on the confines of his domain, he went out with his ministers and worshipped them duly.

One day that son of Diti addressed the Brahmana endued with ascetic merit, saying, "O holy one, grant me a son equal unto Indra." The Brahmana, however, did not grant the Asura a son like Indra. And at this, the Asura was inflamed with wrath against the Brahmana. And from that day, O king, the Asura Ilwala became a destroyer of Brahmanas.

And, O monarch, all of them went together to Ilwala after this!" "Lomasa said, 'When Ilwala learnt that those kings along with the great Rishi had arrived on the confines of his domain, he went out with his ministers and worshipped them duly.

And the mighty Rishi then sat himself down on an excellent seat, and the prince of Asuras, Ilwala, began to distribute the food smilingly. And after the dinner was over, Ilwala began to summon his brother. But thereupon a quantity of air alone came out of the illustrious Rishi's stomach, with a sound that was as loud, O child, as the roar of the clouds.

One day that son of Diti addressed the Brahmana endued with ascetic merit, saying, 'O holy one, grant me a son equal unto Indra. The Brahmana, however, did not grant the Asura a son like Indra. And at this, the Asura was inflamed with wrath against the Brahmana. And from that day, O king, the Asura Ilwala became a destroyer of Brahmanas.

And Ilwala repeatedly said, "Come out, O Vatapi!" Then that best of Munis Agastya bursting out in laughter, said, "How can he come out? I have already digested that great Asura." And Agastya smilingly answered Ilwala, saying, "We know thee, O Asura, to be possessed of great power and also enormous wealth. These kings are not very wealthy while my need also of wealth is great.