Economy is waste: it is waste of the juices of life, the sap of living. For there are two kinds of waste that of the prodigal who throws his substance away in riotous living, and that of the sluggard who allows his substance to rot from non-use. The rigid economizer is in danger of being classed with the sluggard. Extravagance is usually a reaction from suppression of expenditure.

The girl had the whim of playing the part of restrainer and economizer in everything; but Henderson used to say, when Margaret told him of Carmen's suggestions, that a little more of her economy would ruin him. "Yes," Margaret admitted, "there does not seem to be anything that is not necessary." "Not a thing.

Do not speak to them of the value of a well selected term, set down in its right place, still less of a lilting construction, sounding rather well. Childish nonsense they call all that; the fiddling of a short sighted mind! Perhaps they are right: the Baptiste idiom is a great economizer of time and trouble.

It is unusual, in those cases where a simple turbine steam-consumption test is being carried out, and not an efficiency test of a complete plant, to pass the measured feed-water through economizers. Should the latter course, owing to special conditions, become necessary, a careful examination of all economizer pipes would be necessary.

"The more of the details of our daily life we can hand over to the effortless custody of automatism, the more our higher powers of mind will be set free for their own proper work." While you are brushing your hair or tying your shoes, your mind may be engaged in memorizing poetry or calculating arithmetical problems. Habit is thus a great economizer.

The girl had the whim of playing the part of restrainer and economizer in everything; but Henderson used to say, when Margaret told him of Carmen's suggestions, that a little more of her economy would ruin him. "Yes," Margaret admitted, "there does not seem to be anything that is not necessary." "Not a thing.

His career has been considered in the chapter dealing with our statesmen, but let us pause for a moment here to speak of his inventions. One of them, the Franklin stove, is still in use in hundreds of old houses, and as an economizer of fuel has never been surpassed; another was the lightning-rod.

He was the plodder, the bookkeeper, the economizer, the man who had an eye for microscopic details. "What we most admired in young Phipps," a Pittsburgh banker once remarked, "is the way in which he could keep a check in the air for three or four days."