In these, how many soldiers' boys are companions of our glory? he who stands firm in an open trench, what does he in that more than fifty poor pioneers who open to him the way and cover it with their own bodies for fivepence a day pay, do before him? "Non quicquid turbida Roma Elevet, accedas; examenque improbum in illa Castiges trutina: nec to quaesiveris extra."

Nil te quaesiveris extra," implying that his reputation rendered him independent of outward show. Happy would it have been for poor Goldsmith could he have kept this consolatory compliment perpetually in mind, and squared his expenses accordingly.

Already that day exists for us, shines in on us at unawares, but the path of science and of letters is not the way into nature. The idiot, the Indian, the child and unschooled farmer's boy stand nearer to the light by which nature is to be read, than the dissector or the antiquary. "Ne te quaesiveris extra."

Johnson at the same time checked him and paid him a handsome compliment, implying that a man of his talents should be above attention to such distinctions, "Nay, Sir, never mind that. Nil te quaesiveris extra." 'When Mr. Vesey was proposed as a member of The LITERARY CLUB, Mr. Burke began by saying that he was a man of gentle manners.

That pleases these talkative old men. DR. BUSCH, quoted in Lowe's Prince Bismarck, i. 130. See ante, i. 470, for his disapproval of 'studied behaviour. Johnson had perhaps Dr. Warton in mind. Ante, ii. 41, note 1. See ante, i. 471, and iii. 165. 'Oblivion is a kind of annihilation. Sir Thomas Browne's Christian Morals, sect. xxi. 'Nec te quaesiveris extra. Persius, Sat. i. 7.

'I shall soon be in better chambers, sir, than these, he said. 'Nay, sir, answered Johnson, 'never mind that: nil te quaesiveris extra." In 1765, his purse having become somewhat more plethoric, he removed to Garden Court, then, as now, one of the choice spots in the Temple Area. Here he sported a man-servant, and ran head over ears in debt to his trades-people.

'Goldsmith, upon being visited by Johnson one day in the Temple, said to him with a little jealousy of the appearance of his accommodation, "I shall soon be in better chambers than these." Johnson at the same time checked him and paid him a handsome compliment, implying that a man of his talents should be above attention to such distinctions, 'Nay, Sir, never mind that. Nil te quaesiveris extra .