Will he go on shrinking, I wonder? become at last a mere lurking atomy in his own recesses, a kind of hermit crab, the bulk of him a complex mechanism, a thing of rags and tatters and papier-maché, stolen from the earth and the plant-world and his fellow beasts?

She had loved flowers, and he knew the plant-world so well, and was so absolutely master over everything which grew and bloomed in the gardens of which he had charge, that he could often intrust his speechless favorites to tell her things which lips and eyes might not reveal.

She had loved flowers, and he knew the plant-world so well, and was so absolutely master over everything which grew and bloomed in the gardens of which he had charge, that he could often intrust his speechless favorites to tell her things which lips and eyes might not reveal.

She had loved flowers, and he knew the plant-world so well, and was so absolutely master over everything which grew and bloomed in the gardens of which he had charge, that he could often intrust his speechless favorites to tell her things which lips and eyes might not reveal.

See Hunt's "Popular Romances of the West of England." Black's "Folk-medicine," p. 193. "Rabies or Hydrophobia," T. M. Dolan, 1879, p. 238. Black's "Folk-medicine," p. 193. Many of the legends of the plant-world have been incidentally alluded to in the preceding pages.

A similar argument is used in regard toontogeny recapitulating phylogeny.” Palæontology does not disclose in the plant-world anysynthetic types,” which might have been the common primitive stock from which many now divergent branches have sprung, nor does it disclose anytransition linksreally intermediate, for instance, between cryptogams and gymnosperms, or between gymnosperms and angiosperms.

With peach-blossom, however, the equilibrium is of a different kind, owing to the fact that it arises from the union of the colour-poles, not at their original stage but in their 'heightened' form. And so green, the colour of the plant-world harmony given by nature, stands over against 'purple', the colour of the human being striving towards harmony.

I spoke of the paper just read by Francis Darwin, the son of Charles, before the British Association, emphasising the idea that the life of plants and animals differs not in kind but only in degree. Plants may have memory, perhaps show passion, predatory instincts, or rudimentary intelligence. The plant-world is therefore part and parcel of animated nature.

Cases like this point in certain ways to the absolute high-water-mark of vegetable ingenuity: they go nearest of all in the plant-world to the similitude of conscious animal intelligence. Who knows the Mediterranean, knows the prickly pear.

Steinmann declares it to be the primary task of post-Darwinian palaeontology "to arrange the fossil animal and plant-remains in the order of descent and thus to build up a truly natural, because historically demonstrable, classification of the animal and plant-world."