Now, in that island depastured the sheep belonging to the wife of the chieftain of Decies and it is thence that it derives its Irish name Ard-na- Ccaorac, scil.: there was in it a high hill and it was a promontory beautiful to behold. One of the party, ascending the summit of the hill, said to Declan: "How can this little height support your people?"

The distance of Moneroo Plains, and of the Doomot and Morumbidgee Rivers from Sydney, alarms the settler, who knows not the value of those localities; but men whose experience has taught them to set this obstacle at nought, have long depastured their herds on the banks of the last two.

The distance of Moneroo Plains, and of the Doomot and Morumbidgee Rivers from Sydney, alarms the settler, who knows not the value of those localities; but men whose experience has taught them to set this obstacle at nought, have long depastured their herds on the banks of the last two.

It is farther said, that the number of sheep now depastured on the lands behind Port Lincoln, amounts to 70,000 a proof of the utility, if not the richness of the country as far, however, as I am aware, the soil must be considered of an inferior description in other respects, the Port has advantages that will always render it an agreeable, if not altogether a desirable residence.

Now, in that island depastured the sheep belonging to the wife of the chieftain of Decies and it is thence that it derives its Irish name Ard-na-Ccaorac, scil.: there was in it a high hill and it was a promontory beautiful to behold. One of the party, ascending the summit of the hill, said to Declan: "How can this little height support your people?"

These plains, so famous for the richness of their pasture, and for the excellency of the sheep and cattle depastured upon them, have become equally remarkable as the depositaries of the remains of extinct species of animals, several of which must have been of a gigantic size, being the Marsupial representatives of the Pachydermal order of other continents. Mr.

Outside the walls of the city lie the estates of the Church, depastured at certain seasons by a few herds, tended by men clad in skins, and looking as savage as the animals they tend; while inside the walls are some hundred thousand Romans, enduring from one year's end to another all the miseries of a partial famine. Nor is there the least hope that matters will mend so long as the Papacy lasts.

As the generous bull who, having long depastured among a number of cows, and thence contracted an opinion that these cows are all his own property, if he beholds another bull bestride a cow within his walks, he roars aloud, and threatens instant vengeance with his horns, till the whole parish are alarmed with his bellowing; not with less noise nor less dreadful menaces did the fury of Wild burst forth and terrify the whole gate.