A mollyhawk was brought in today, it weighed four pounds and measured from tip of beak to tip of tail thirty inches, from tip of wing to tip of wing seventy-eight, and in girth twenty. The bird cannot rise up from level ground, but must get to the edge of a cliff or hill, unless helped by the wind. Cricket is being much played by the boys.

"It is good that they should fight among themselves." But the old Chinese merely grinned and shook his head. "You don't think they have been fighting?" I queried. "No fight. They eat'm mollyhawk and albatross; mollyhawk and albatross eat'm fat pork; two men he die, plenty men much sick, you bet, damn to hell me very much glad. I savve." And I think he was right.

Graham much enjoyed the day, and thinks they must have walked thirty miles. Going up they watched the sealer cautiously sailing round Inaccessible. They also got a view of the Peak, which had a little snow on it. Mr. Keytel photographed the Mollyhawk on its nest. Saturday, October 10. There was a south-east wind blowing last night.

I fear the flowers will not do very well because of the wind, but still if only a few grow it will be something to look at. I should like to try anemones. Mollyhawk eggs are just in. They are large in size, of a long oval shape, and with reddish-brown markings and spots. The men say this bird never lays more than one egg each season. Sunday, October 7.

From July to October the men get a great number of eaglet, penguin, and mollyhawk eggs all sea-fowl. Fish can be caught all the year round. Any groceries obtained must come from passing ships. Sometimes months go by without tea, coffee, sugar, flour, salt and soap being seen.