For the workers of Myrmica have not even rudiments of ocelli, though the male and female ants of this genus have well-developed ocelli. I may give one other case: so confidently did I expect to find gradations in important points of structure between the different castes of neuters in the same species, that I gladly availed myself of Mr.

The ants construct around these insects cabins made of fragments of wood, and wall them in completely so as to keep them at their own disposal. The Myrmica also forms similar pasture lands; its system is rather less perfect than that of the Lasius, as it does not form covered galleries to reach its stables. It is content to build large earth huts around a colony.

I may digress by adding, that if the smaller workers had been the most useful to the community, and those males and females had been continually selected, which produced more and more of the smaller workers, until all the workers had come to be in this condition; we should then have had a species of ant with neuters very nearly in the same condition with those of Myrmica.

For the workers of Myrmica have not even rudiments of ocelli, though the male and female ants of this genus have well-developed ocelli. I may give one other case: so confidently did I expect occasionally to find gradations of important structures between the different castes of neuters in the same species, that I gladly availed myself of Mr.

For the workers of Myrmica have not even rudiments of ocelli, though the male and female ants of this genus have well-developed ocelli. I may give one other case: so confidently did I expect to find gradations in important points of structure between the different castes of neuters in the same species, that I gladly availed myself of Mr.

Lincecum's most important published paper on the habits of the Myrmica molefaciens appeared in the Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Philadelphia, vol. xviii., 1866, p. 323-331. See also Darwin, Proceedings of the Linnæan Soc., 1861. H. C. McCook, Natural History of the Agricultural Ants of Texas, Philadelphia, 1879, pp. 33-39. McCook, Agricultural Ants of Texas, pp. 105-107. Gardening Ants.

I may digress by adding, that if the smaller workers had been the most useful to the community, and those males and females had been continually selected, which produced more and more of the smaller workers, until all the workers were in this condition; we should then have had a species of ant with neuters in nearly the same condition as those of Myrmica.

I may digress by adding, that if the smaller workers had been the most useful to the community, and those males and females had been continually selected, which produced more and more of the smaller workers, until all the workers had come to be in this condition; we should then have had a species of ant with neuters very nearly in the same condition with those of Myrmica.