The margins of the wound were cleansed as heretofore described, a drainage was provided surgically, tincture of iodin was injected and the wound was covered with equal parts of boric acid and exsiccated alum. The horse was kept tied and a diluted tincture of iodin was injected into the wound once daily and the powder applied often enough to keep the wound covered.

If daily injections are necessary, dilution of the tincture of iodin with an equal amount of alcohol is advisable in order to avoid doing irreparable damage to the articular cartilages and synovial membranes. An antiseptic powder composed of equal parts of boric acid and exsiccated alum is employed to protect the wound surfaces and the margins, and the parts are then bandaged.

The composition of the powder should be such as to permit of its liberal use, thereby affording mechanical protection to the wound as well as exerting a desiccative effect. Equal parts of boric acid and exsiccated alum serve very well in such cases.

So we both alleged a state of utter repletion, and did not solve the mystery of the contents of the cupboard, not too luxurious, it may be conjectured, and yet kindly offered, so that we felt there was a moist filament of the social instinct running like a nerve through that exsiccated and almost anhydrous organism. We left him with professions of esteem and respect which were real.

So we both alleged a state of utter repletion, and did not solve the mystery of the contents of the cupboard, not too luxurious, it may be conjectured, and yet kindly offered, so that we felt there was a moist filament of the social instinct running like a nerve through that exsiccated and almost anhydrous organism. We left him with professions of esteem and respect which were real.

When bandaged, such wounds need dressing more or less frequently, as individual instances demand. Equal parts of boric acid and exsiccated alum constitute a suitable combination for the treatment of these cases, and this powder should be liberally employed. Tincture of iodin may be injected into the joint capsule where there is provision for its ready evacuation, as conditions seem to require.

The fresh root, wounded early in the spring, yields and odorous yellow juice, which slowly exsiccated proves an elegant gummy resin, very rich in the virtues of the Angelica. On drying the root, this juice concretes into distinct moleculae, which, on cutting it longitudinally, appear distributed in little veins: in this state they are extracted by pure spirit, but not by watery liquors.

Care is taken to apply the iodin also to the surface immediately surrounding the wound. The entire wound is then covered with a dusting powder composed of zinc oxide, boric acid, exsiccated alum, phenol and camphor. This powder is used in abundance and the wound is then covered with a heavy layer of absorbent cotton and well bandaged.