The "Morgante Maggiore," therefore, is neither really comic nor really serious. It is not a piece of realistic grotesqueness like "Gargantua" or "Pantagruel," any more than it is a serious ideal work like "Amadis de Gaula:" the proportion of deliberately sought effects is small; the great bulk, serious or comic, seems to have come quite at random.

At the end of the fourteenth century was written, most probably in Portuguese by Vasco de Lobeira, the tale of "Amadis de Gaula," which was followed by some forty or fifty similar books telling the adventures of all the brothers, nephews, sons, grandsons sons, and great-grandsons, an infinite succession, of the original Amadis; which, translated into all languages and presently multiplied by the press, seem to have usurped the place of the Arthurian stories in feudal countries until well-nigh the middle of the sixteenth century; and which were succeeded by no more stories of heroes, but by the realistic comic novels of the type of "Lazarillo de Tormes," and the buffoon philosophic extravaganzas of "Gargantua."

"Amadis de Gaula ... folio, gothic letter, FIRST EDITION, unique ... red morocco super extra, double with olive morocco, richly gilt, tooled to an elegant Grolier design, gilt edges ... in a neat case." A pretty present for a scholarly friend. A nice old book to carry home for one's own library. Two hundred pounds one thousand dollars will make you the happy owner of this volume.

"Amadis de Gaula ... folio, gothic letter, FIRST EDITION, unique ... red morocco super extra, double with olive morocco, richly gilt, tooled to an elegant Grolier design, gilt edges ... in a neat case." A pretty present for a scholarly friend. A nice old book to carry home for one's own library. Two hundred pounds one thousand dollars will make you the happy owner of this volume.