Virtually banished from France, she now wrote her Delphine, a brilliant novel which was widely read. It received its name from a singular circumstance. "Desirous of meeting the First Consul for some urgent reason," says Dr. Stevens in his charming biography of Madame de Staël, "she went to the villa of Madame de Montessan, whither he frequently resorted.

They, with several of the princes of the blood and some of the peers, as already mentioned, had been banished for their opposition to the abolition of the Parliaments; but now, in the hopes of obtaining the king's consent to his marriage with Madame de Montessan, a widow of enormous wealth, the Due d'Orléans made overtures for forgiveness, accompanying them, however, with a letter so insolent that it might we be regarded as an aggravation of his original offense.

"Prince Romanelli." "For one! And the other?" "Monsieur de Montessan." "Those are the two! It is just that. Those two would be acceptable, but only acceptable, and that is not enough." This is why Bettina awaited with extreme impatience the day when she should leave Paris, and take up their abode in Longueval. She was a little tired of so much pleasure, so much success, so many offers of marriage.

"Report says that that will be a match; that it is already settled." "A match may be arranged, but with Montessan, not with Romanelli. Ah! at last! Here is the ballet." They ceased to talk. The ballet in Aida lasts only five minutes, and for those five minutes they had come.

"Report says that that will be a match; that it is already settled." "A match may be arranged, but with Montessan, not with Romanelli. Ah! at last! Here is the ballet." They ceased to talk. The ballet in Aida lasts only five minutes, and for those five minutes they had come.

"Prince Romanelli." "For one! And the other?" "Monsieur de Montessan." "Those are the two! It is just that. Those two would be acceptable, but only acceptable, and that is not enough." This is why Bettina awaited with extreme impatience the day when she should leave Paris, and take up their abode in Longueval. She was a little tired of so much pleasure, so much success, so many offers of marriage.

"Report says that that will be a match; that it is already settled." "A match may be arranged, but with Montessan, not with Romanelli. Ah! at last! Here is the ballet." They ceased to talk. The ballet in Aida lasts only five minutes, and for those five minutes they had come.

"Prince Romanelli." "For one! And the other?" "Monsieur de Montessan." "Those are the two! It is just that. Those two would be acceptable, but only acceptable, and that is not enough." This is why Bettina awaited with extreme impatience the day when she should leave Paris, and take up their abode in Longueval. She was a little tired of so much pleasure, so much success, so many offers of marriage.