"Aetas, labor, corporisque opima pinguetudo, effecerant, ante annum, ut inertibus refertum, grave, hebes, plenitudine turgens corpus, anhelum ad motus minimos, cum sensu suffocationis, pulsu mirifice anomalo, ineptum evaderet ad ullum motum.

The second day lecture, April 17, was concerned with a description of the organs of the thorax, and after a discussion on the structure and action of the heart come the lines: W. H. constat per fabricam cordis sanguinem per pulmones in Aortam perpetuo transferri, as by two clacks of a water bellows to rayse water constat per ligaturam transitum sanguinis ab arteriis ad venas unde perpetuum sanguinis motum in circulo fieri pulsu cordis.

These sensitive fevers, like the irritative ones, resolve themselves into those with arterial strength, and those with arterial debility, that is with excess or defect of sensorial power; these may be termed the febris sensitiva pulsu forti, sensitive fever with strong pulse, which is the synocha, or inflammatory fever; and the febris sensitiva pulsu debili, sensitive fever with weak pulse, which is the typhus gravior, or putrid fever of some writers.

Where the pulse is small this defect of distention is present, and contributes much to produce the febris irritativa pulsu debili, or irritative fever with weak pulse, called by modern writers nervous fever, as a predisponent cause. See Sect.

I. When the contractile sides of the heart and arteries perform a greater number of pulsations in a given time, and move through a greater area at each pulsation, whether these motions are occasioned by the stimulus of the acrimony or quantity of the blood, or by their association with other irritative motions, or by the increased irritability of the arterial system, that is, by an increased quantity of sensorial power, one kind of fever is produced; which may be called Synocha irritativa, or Febris irritativa pulsu forti, or irritative fever with strong pulse.

When the contractile sides of the heart and arteries perform a greater number of pulsations in a given time, but move through a much less area at each pulsation, whether these motions are occasioned by defect of their natural stimuli, or by the defect of other irritative motions with which they are associated, or from the inirritability of the arterial system, that is, from a decreased quantity of sensorial power, another kind of fever arises; which may be termed, Typhus irritativus, or Febris irritativa pulsu debili, or irritative fever with weak pulse.