If he is a man of keen sensibilities, the pressure of such care is so insupportable that he takes prompt and effective measures to remove it; and his fear thus becomes an element in his success, because it urges him to action, and at the same time teaches him the need of due precaution. As Horace wrote: "Sperat infestis, metuit secundis Alteram sortem."

The Latin tragic poet touches close upon that sentiment in the fine lines "Rex est qui metuit nihil; Hoc regnum sibi quisque dat." So stood the brothers, Sweyn the outlaw and Harold the Earl, before the reputed prophetess. She looked on both with a steady eye, which gradually softened almost into tenderness, as it finally rested upon the pilgrim.

Dalrymple started and shook himself like a water-dog, as if he would so shake off "the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune." "Rex est qui metuit nihil!" said he; "but I am a sovereign in bad circumstances, for all that. Heigho! Care will kill a cat. What shall we do with ourselves, old fellow, for the rest of the day?" "I hardly know. Would you like to go into the country?" "Nothing better.

The Latin tragic poet touches close upon that sentiment in the fine lines "Rex est qui metuit nihil; Hoc regnum sibi quisque dat." So stood the brothers, Sweyn the outlaw and Harold the Earl, before the reputed prophetess. She looked on both with a steady eye, which gradually softened almost into tenderness, as it finally rested upon the pilgrim.