Hamburg should remain as it was at the conclusion of negotiations, and the duration of the armistice must be longer than the term proposed six weeks at the least. On these two points he took his stand. The fatal armistice of Poischwitz was signed at that village on June fourth by three commissioners, Shuvaloff for Russia, Kleist for Prussia, and Caulaincourt for France.

In the negotiations concerning the armistice they showed no timidity; and when, on June 4th, it was signed at Poischwitz up to July 20th, Napoleon felt some doubts whether he had not shown too much complaisance. It was so: in granting a suspension of arms he had signed his own death warrant. The news that reached him at Dresden in the month of June helped to stiffen his resolve once more.

In the negotiations concerning the armistice they showed no timidity; and when, on June 4th, it was signed at Poischwitz up to July 20th, Napoleon felt some doubts whether he had not shown too much complaisance. It was so: in granting a suspension of arms he had signed his own death warrant. The news that reached him at Dresden in the month of June helped to stiffen his resolve once more.

Condition of Affairs after Bautzen The Armistice of Poischwitz Austria's New Terms Napoleon's Reliance on his Dynastic Influence Intervention of British Agents Napoleon's Interview with Metternich The Emperor's Wrath Metternich's Determination Wellington's Victories Napoleon at Mainz The Coalition Completed Diplomatic Fencing Renewal of Hostilities The Responsibility.

A renewed offer of Austrian mediation drew from him a declaration in favour of an armistice and a diplomatic congress. On June 4 an armistice was actually concluded at Poischwitz to last until August 1, and a neutral zone was provided to separate the combatants. On June 7 the demands of Austria were presented to Napoleon.

The Poischwitz armistice was his first fatal blunder; before the close of the interview he consented to its prolongation until August tenth, ostensibly that the Congress of Prague might arrange terms for a continental peace; and this was his undoing.

If we view the negotiations of Poischwitz and Prague in connection with Napoleon's whole career, they appear to have run in a channel prepared by his boundless ambition; if we isolate them and scrutinize their course, we must think him the moral victor. Whatever he may have been before, he was now eager for peace, and sincere in his professions.