At the time of this year's festival Mr. Eames was supremely happy. Another pamphlet had come into his hands, an anonymous pamphlet making fun of the Duchess whose reception into the Roman Church had been fixed for the day of Saint Eulalia's festival. The stuff was printed on the sly and hastily circulated about the island some people maintained that Mr.

"Really . . . ?" The fireworks were splendid; altogether, Saint Eulalia's day proved a tremendous success. The festal joy was only marred by the unseemly behaviour of Miss Wilberforce, who profited by the occasion to let off some fireworks, or at least steam, of her own. In broad daylight too. This was something new, and rather ominous. The dear lady was becoming quite a problem.

If he takes an aversion to me, it will give me acute pain; but I shall try to bear it meekly, as a part of the punishment my fault deserves." "If you don't intend to take him from me, what was the use of telling me this dreadful story?" impatiently asked Mrs. Fitzgerald. "I felt compelled to do it on Eulalia's account," responded Mrs. King. "Ah, yes!" sighed the lady.

'To-morrow I suggest the vicinity of the Court of Honour and the Administration Building. It's the Princess Eulalia's day, you remember; or had you failed to note that? 'Go on, boy; wound me where I'm weakest, scoffed Dave. But I chose to ignore Dave's chaff. 'I suggest that we join the crowd early, and stay with it late. 'Done! cried he. 'It's hard to tell where they will elect to work.