With similar success the other consul conducted his operations against the Satricans; who, though Roman citizens, had, after the misfortune at Caudium, revolted to the Samnites, and received a garrison into their city.

The Satricans, however, when the Roman army approached their walls, sent deputies to sue for peace, with humble entreaties; to whom the consul answered harshly, that "they must not come again to him, unless they either put to death, or delivered up, the Samnite garrison:" by which terms greater terror was struck into the colonists than by the arms with which they were threatened.

Luceria was occupied by them and Fregellae surprised and taken by assault before the Romans had reorganized their broken army; the passing of the Satricans over to the Samnites shows what they might have accomplished, had they not allowed their advantage to slip through their hands.

Luceria was occupied by them and Fregellae surprised and taken by assault before the Romans had reorganized their broken army; the passing of the Satricans over to the Samnites shows what they might have accomplished, had they not allowed their advantage to slip through their hands.

The Romans considered their being at liberty to make war, a certain victory; while the Samnites supposed the Romans victorious, the moment they resumed their arms. Meanwhile, the Satricans revolted to the Samnites, who attacked the colony of Fregellae, by a sudden surprise in the night, accompanied, as it appears, by the Satricans.

Thus, in the short space of one hour, the Samnites were put to the sword, the Satricans made prisoners, and all things reduced under the power of the consul; who, having instituted an inquiry by whose means the revolt had taken place, scourged with rods and beheaded such as he found to be guilty; and then, disarming the Satricans, he placed a strong garrison in the place.