Then he went into the field, and hid himself in a bush by the meadow's side; and he soon saw with his own eyes how they drove the flock of geese; and how, after a little time, she let down her hair that glittered in the sun. And then he heard her say: 'Blow, breezes, blow! Let Curdken's hat go! Blow, breezes, blow! Let him after it go!

O'er hills, dales, and rocks, Away be it whirl'd Till the silvery locks Are all comb'd and curl'd! And soon came a gale of wind, and carried away Curdken's hat, and away went Curdken after it, while the girl went on combing and curling her hair.

Alas! alas! if they mother knew it, Sadly, sadly, would she rue it. Then she drove on the geese, and sat down again in the meadow, and began to comb out her hair as before; and Curdken ran up to her, and wanted to take hold of it; but she cried out quickly: 'Blow, breezes, blow! Let Curdken's hat go! Blow, breezes, blow! Let him after it go!

Then they went out of the city, and drove the geese on. And when she came to the meadow, she sat down upon a bank there, and let down her waving locks of hair, which were all of pure silver; and when Curdken saw it glitter in the sun, he ran up, and would have pulled some of the locks out, but she cried: 'Blow, breezes, blow! Let Curdken's hat go! Blow, breezes, blow! Let him after it go!

O'er hills, dales, and rocks, Away be it whirl'd Till the silvery locks Are all comb'd and curl'd! Then there came a wind, so strong that it blew off Curdken's hat; and away it flew over the hills: and he was forced to turn and run after it; till, by the time he came back, she had done combing and curling her hair, and had put it up again safe.