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Kynaston, who styled himself Corporis Armiger, and who had printed in 1635 a translation into Latin verse of Chaucer's Troilus and Cressida, was nominated the first regent of the Academy, and published in 1636 its constitution and rules, addressed 'to the noble and generous well-wishers to vertuous actions and learning. The Academy 'justified and approved by the wisdom of the King's most sacred Majesty and many of the lords of his Majesty's most honourable privy council, its constitution and discipline being ratified under the hands and seals of the Right Honourable the Lord Keeper of the Great Seal of England and the two Lord Chief Justices professed to be founded 'according to the laudable customs of other nations, and for 'the bringing of virtue into action and the theory of liberal arts into more frequent practice. Its aims were directed to the end that England might be as well furnished for the virtuous education and discipline of her own natives as any other nation of Europe; it being 'sufficiently known that the subjects of his Majesty's dominions have naturally as noble minds and as able bodies as any nation of the earth, and therefore deserve all accommodation for the advancing of them, either in speculation or action. It was considered that a peculiar institution was required for teaching those 'most useful accomplishments of a gentleman' the sciences of navigation, riding, fortification, architecture, painting, etc., which, if taught, were yet not practised in the universities or courts of law.